Final Fantasy XIV Online: First Impressions!

Power -up players for the 1st First Impressions post of 2018, on my very first Final Fantasy Game EVER: Final Fantasy XIV Online. I’ve mentioned before that I have never played any of the Final Fantasy games, mainly because when they were first released, they were turn based RPG Games that I did not care for. After reading great posts by my blogging buddies The Shameful Narcissist and Lightning Ellen, I have been more open to the idea of playing Final Fantasy games. My online gaming group have been sending me deals for Final Fantasy XIV online and I finally gave in!

 

Story:

ff quest

Something that I am aware of is the excellent storytelling in the World of Final Fantasy. FFXIV does it’s predecessors proud by offering an immersive story! You start as a wanderer who is summoned by a supernatural force. Your character is given gifts in which you will use to help save the land.  The story starts on a ship and everyone in the land that I have started in is a pirate. I have to admit, reading so of that slang tripped me up a bit.

Gameplay & Controls:

The gameplay is pretty fun. There’s a lot of dialogue that you can opty to read or if you’re in the mood for a fun tory, you can read to fully immerse yourself in the Final Fantasy world. When I stream the game on Twitch or record my gameplay, I have fun and read the dialogue in different voices. I am currently playing FFXIV on PC, so the controls are standard for a RPG game. With PC one of the luxuries are the ability to keybind skills or actions to your playstyle, but I find the preset keys work well in FFXIV Online.

Graphics & Sounds:

The game is beautiful. On my gaming PC the colors are vibrant and smooth. They blend together really well and I can finally say that I am starting to become a graphics type of girl when it comes to my video games. I really enjoy the soundtrack and music in FFXIV. I love when a game’s music can shift my mood. You can tell when a big fight is about to break out when the music changes dramatically and you are no longer listening to the melodic, happy tune while you were traveling.

Classes:

FF Face

There are a few different classes that you can select to play with your character. Each class, has one of 3 starting locations: Ul’dah, Limsa Lominsa and . There are the traditional roles of Tank, DPS and Healer which will depend on the class that you select. I love magical damage classes, so I selected the Arcanist. The Arcanist can evolve into a Summoner or Scholar so you pretty much have the best of both worlds. I can heal and distribute magical damage with the Arcanist class.

One of the perks of my class is that I can Summon a creature (in the form of a cute electric blue fox) who can guard me, fight for me or even heal for me. I have a tank version of this pet as well so while running dungeons (or solo multi entity quests) I summon my creature and have him pull aggro. Sometimes he gets out of control and I have to send him away as 20 enemies run towards me lol.

 

DLC & Features:

ff accept

I purchased the complete edition of the game that included the 2 DLC’s. This makes the game MASSIVE! I’m in the first DLC and progressing through that story now and boy is it grindy. I played all day on Wednesday and I’m only level 18, Yikes! I like it though, there are a variety of missions from collecting items, to finding and talking to NPC’s to exterminating creatures. Each quest will have something a bit different to keep you playing and pushing through the grind.

Other than the main and side quests, you can level your characters in a variety of ways. You can attack higher level creature in the world and XP will be gained for each kill (although you obtain more experience when you complete quests). There are instances know as “Fate’s” that you can plan to gain experience, money (gil) and items. Fates will be marked with a purple circle on your map. Each Fate has a requirement to complete (mostly to destroy a certain number of creatures in a specified time) before the instance disappears. Fate’s are the equivalent of World Events in Destiny 2 where other players can team up to help complete the task quickly.

LeveQuests are another feature of the game in which you can level up your character. When you are a high enough level, you will be able to accept these mini quests that combine the features of the Fate events and quest items into 1. You will have a set task that you will need to complete and you are rewarded by the completion, difficulty and speed of your task.

Replayability:

Right now I am all in for Final Fantasy! There’s so much to do that it keeps me occupied. If I don’t want to run quests, I go and complete Fate’s or LeveQuests. I also train and upgrade my gear. There are dungeons and other multiplayer features of the game that I have not tried out yet. I can see myself playing this game for a few months. It’s a bit like any other RPG but it’s still fun to play alone or with friends.

Final Thoughts:

Capture

I am really enjoying the game at the moment. This is a great experience for my first Final Fantasy game and I anticipate playing for quite some time. I love that I am able to journey around and that there are plenty of activities to keep my interest. With the addion of seasonal events and DLC, I can see myself playing FFXIV online for the entire year. My gameplay of Final Fantasy XIV online was uploaded this morning to our YouTube channel. Click here to watch!

I give Final Fantasy XIV Online 4 out of 5 Power Ups!

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Wheew! That was a lot of information for a First Impressions post, but Final Fantasy XIV Online is a truly massive game. I may start writing monthly updates on the game regarding the current events or new features that I have tried. Have you played FFXIV online? Which class do you play or like to play in RPG’s? Let’s talk RPGs!

-Luna 🙂

 

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12 Days of Christmas Day 10: Gaming Closet Raid!

Happy Saturday Players! We are nearing the end of the Creative Christmas Collaboration posts set up by Kim from Later Levels! If you have been reading our previous posts, you know the drill but for anyone new to the post and the blog, you can view the official rules and participate in the remaining 2 days of the challenge by clicking here!

Today’s Topic is…

You’ve been invited to a swanky New Year’s Eve party but have nothing suitable to wear! Which video game character do you call to ask if you can borrow an outfit?

This one was a bit harder for me to think about but I did come up with and answer. I think the best answer that comes to mind is an RPG game. In Role Playing games one of the perks and appeals for me is the customization. I want to be able to make my character look, act and behave a certain way. I love being able to visit clothiers and dye shops to enhance my character’s look. Being able to mix and match styles to make an original outfit (until you see someone running around with your same costume on) makes or breaks a game for me and my friend Stephanie. Stephanie or Xsanie, introduces me to cute RPG and Anime games often.  aura  Once anime RPG game that we play is called Aura Kingdom (review coming soon). This game has dye shops and the item mall that you can use to properly dress your avatar. The clothes are bright, brilliant and bold so I would love to warp into the kingdom and select an outfit to use.

If I had to pick a person, Kasumi from Dead or Alive would be a great selection. She wears her altered Kimonos really well and I think they would be a hit for a swanky New Year’s Eve party. The cherry blossom petals, the red and white and the split all the way up her thigh.

My boyfriend probably wouldn’t approve but I’d definitely loved to borrow the outfit from her closet! Maybe drop by and have Chun-Li do me hair lol.

If it was a super formal affair I could ring up Daisy from the Mario games. This is a great idea for a few reasons; Daisy is a Princess so her closest will contain vast outfits for me to wear. A nice, long dress with ruffles seems like a fitting way to bring in the new year. Maybe I can convince Daisy to join me at the party and we can arrive fashionably late with an entrance fit for royalty.   daisy  I can see it now, the royal trumpeters will announce our arrival and we will walk in looking as elegant and as regal as possible. I’m super interested in royals and medieval nobilty that I wouldn’t mind wearing a corset and a puffy dress for an evening. Hopefully no one will trip and spill their drink on me!

Those are some of the choices that I would make for selecting a New Year’s outfit. Which video game character would you ask for help? What type of game clothing would you want to wear? Let’s talk video games!

-Luna 🙂

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Creating a Compelling RPG Villain

“Don’t talk like you’re one of them! You’re not… even if you’d like to be. To them you’re just a freak, like me. They need you right now, but when they don’t, they’ll cast you out. Like a leper. See, their morals, their “code”… it’s a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They’re only as good as the world allows them to be. I’ll show you. When the chips are down, these “civilized people?” They’ll eat each other. See, I’m not a monster. I’m just ahead of the curve.”

– Joker, “The Dark Knight”

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Godblood2It’s said that no one ever sees themselves as the villain, merely the hero of their own story. In the world of tabletop gaming, however, the heroes and villains tend to be rather distinguishable. Heroes wearing shining armor and stand for honor and virtue, while villains wear black and are covered in blood as they spout threats in a quest to destroy all life. Sympathy for the villain can be rare or so minor it becomes a nonfactor, and sometimes this is alright. However, when you create a story that may take months or even years to unravel, this black-and-white portrayal can seem a little bland and the adventure eventually redundant.

Every creative venue has methods for creating engaging protagonists and antagonists. There are countless books and videos detailing what makes a “great” novel or movie villain, but tabletop gaming is a different animal. Players aren’t just readers or spectators; they are active participants in the story. Every good campaign should have a strong force of opposition, whether it’s a large force or – more likely – a primary individual that must be stopped. The road to get to that end need not be a straight line, and below are a few suggestions on how to fashion a compelling and interesting villain against whom your heroes will do battle.

1. SECRET MOTIVES

In movies especially and novels to a lesser extent it is generally considered a good idea to present the motives, agenda, or at least affiliation of the antagonist fairly early on. This sets the stakes for the protagonists, plots their own goals, and helps compare and contrast the two forces. In the long-term pacing of tabletop gaming, however – in which players must piece together clues as they go – a good villain remains a mystery until the very end. If the evil Dragon King is set on destroying Goodville, you can bet the heroes will head for and make camp in Goodville for most of the campaign. They’d have no real reason to do otherwise.

Keeping players on their toes accomplishes two things simultaneously: it keeps the campaign from getting boring and it puts space between the heroes and the villain. A village on fire is certainly cause for concern and action on the part of the heroes, but was it intentional? Was it part of the villain’s plot? Is the fire merely a distraction as she maneuvers elsewhere? What secrets did she want to destroy with this fire? These are questions that make players think, and can turn even a simple plan of conquest into a far-reaching campaign of intrigue. In addition, having heroes investigate a burning town for clues and rumors allows the villain to continue on to her next task is relative safety, the fog of mystery becoming a smokescreen for her and her minions.

2. HINT OF HUMANITY

Building onthe “no one sees themselves as a villain” motif, a purely evil and destructive force – while certainly deadly – can become two-dimensional. Bringing even the slightest glimmer of humanity into the darkest heart can not only strengthen the character of the antagonist but throw your players into their own alignment quandaries. Maybe the villain saw his entire village burn down, and the authorities refused to help him. Maybe he had a loved one who left or died, fostering a deep sadness that soon became rage. Maybe he is cursed, and has no control of his actions. Maybe he is actually the unwitting servant of a greater evil. He could feel his actions are inevitable, and that redemption is impossible. Whether or not humanity wins out in the end, merely breaking the black-and-white mold may make some heroes second-guess their zealous quest to destroy them.

3. HONORABLE EVIL

Few things are as bewildering and alignment-challenging in an RPG as a villain who shows honor. This is a fantastic aspect in cultural campaigns such as Rokugan or Feudal Japan in which honor and dishonor replace typical notions of good and evil. An scorpion2honorable villain, though a bloodthirsty murder, could reach out to the heroes in a civil manner.

She could be honest in her plans and truthful in conversations, even if it’s at odds with the heroes. She could spare the lives of heroes who break into her abode, simply because she knows they were under orders to do so. She could congratulate the heroes on victories or even aid them against rivals. She could refuse to strike first and always greet the heroes unarmed until threatened.

Maybe the villain is actually in the right? What if the dark lord is the rightful ruler of the kingdom, even if he’s evil? What if the “good” King wrongfully accused and condemned the villain’s late sibling, prompting him to take up arms in retaliation? What if the Orcs were promised land, and when they weren’t granted the Chieftan waged war against the human squatters in his forest?

For heroes that are truly law-abiding and honor-focused, this can be a seriously difficult thing to deal with and makes for some very interesting encounters.

4. VILLAINS WIN, UNTIL THEY LOSE

A truly compelling and engaging antagonist always seems to be a step ahead. This can be difficult to balance, because too many losses can be frustrating or downright infuriating to the heroes. Tabletop gaming is an improvised art form, which allows for a unique opportunity to build up a villain as more crafty and ingenious than they actually are. The method for doing so is simple: you cheat.

Any situation, whether a victory or failure by the heroes, can be spun to be “part of the villain’s plan.” That village they liberated? They are secretly loyal to the antagonist, and once they leave the villain now has a stronger base than before. The random Orc patrol the heroes thought was a waste of time? They carried a powerful magical item that could’ve turned the tide of the war. The scrap of paper no one can translate? It’s now the password into the villain’s lair. While such spin-doctoring should be used sparingly, it can help build the dynamic that they are always playing into the villain’s hands – until the end, when the tables are turned.

A solid example is what I call the “Moriarty Effect.” It’s a classic dupe often perpetrated after the players fail to investigate something properly. For instance, a woman pleads for the heroes to find her children that ran into a dark cave. If no one bothers to roll for insight or check for illusions, suddenly that innocuous stranger could become the villain or her henchman in disguise – and a rather deadly secret is awaiting the heroes in that cave.

5. KILLING AN IDEAL

Drawing on real-world influences, one of the most seemingly impossible tasks facing the heroes is to combat an ideal. Villains can be killed. Beliefs are immortal. The villain could simply be the face of a culture, religion, social caste, or cult that is far-reaching and growing. Perhaps the villain champions a revolt against a king due to high taxes and an overreaching military. Suddenly the heroes must now contend with entire cities of like-minded civilians who see the heroes as villains themselves. Perhaps the Dark Priest is simply one leader out of countless throughout the world. Now the heroes must not only drop the Priest from destroying the land, but weed out the rest of the church as well. It is like a hydra, cutting off one head while two more take its place. Such conundrums prevent a relatively small or straightforward task (killing the villain) as the tip of the iceberg. The heroes must dig out the roots, or the felled tree will continue to regrow over and over.

OVERALL

Villains are vital to any campaign, and the stronger the antagonist the richer the campaign will be. While the story is important, without a compelling force to oppose the heroes their quest may well seem hollow.

Luna’s Rankings: RPG Games!

Happy Tuesday Players! It’s time for another one of my rankings for the week! Today we are ranking my top RPG (Role Playing Games) from my least favorite to my favorite! Let’s see who makes the list today! Role Playing games are a staple in the video game world! They allow us to create characters, take on missions and even choose between some morally awkward situations. Each game offers something unique and different, that’s why I am ranking my top games from the RPG games that I have played!

Fable III – Fable III hits the bottom of the list for one reason; I could never finish it!   Fable IIIWhy? Well because this game was horrible, not in design or play through because all of that was great! It was horrible because of the choices that you had to make. You played as a Monarch and you had to overthrow your evil sibling from the throne. This of course now makes you the leader of the realm and you start to see why your brother was making choices that to the outside world seemed cruel. The choices that you make have consequences either way. Let’s just say that sparing a villager who committed a petty crime, could in turn cause hundreds to die. That game sucked just because of the choices lol.

Elder Scrolls Online – ESO is a really great game.  eso  This game takes the magic and wonder of Oblivion and Skyrim and adds in the multiplayer element that I completely love. Elder Scrolls takes on the same premise as all their games in Bethseda’s history, however, now we have factions and we can play with friends. During the midnight release all of my friends selected Aldemeri Dominion to start and we had… well we had difficulty getting into the server that night. I believe we were finally able to log in about 4 hours after the fact. This first impression is probably why ESO fell down in the rankings for me. But once we were in, we were able to have fun until the passion for the game burned out. Although I’m not currently interested in ESO, it is a game that I will always come back to!

Fable – The original Fable started my RPG gaming adventure!  fable  If you read my Evolution of A Gamer post, you will remember that I was gifted with my brother’s Xbox when the Xbox 360 released. Along with the system he gave me a few games and among them was the first Fable game (side not my brother Kenny never played it lol). This was the first game that I completed the story mode by myself! I didn’t ask for my brother’s help and I just grinded it out! The ability to make your own choices in the game and have free range (mostly) to steal or marry was a new development at the time of Fable’s release.

Fable II comes in at the number 3 slot.   fable II  It almost made it to number 1 but I have such fond memories of the game that occupies that ranking on my list. Fable II was an awesome game! I remember getting the game when it released and playing through the story. I loved that you were able to combine spells in this game and the option to select a female character was a bonus. The story was amazing and I had fun just playing side missions or making money as a Pie Maker! Don’t forget about all of the fun of kicking chickens!This game was a bit of a hack though,. When you went to the ton square in Bowerstone you could meet up with your friends (floating as orbs) and give each other money. My one friend gave us all 1 million dollars lol.

Phantasy Star Universe –  psu  PSU was an online MMORPG game that I played with friends back in the Xbox 360 days! This was one of my first experiences with upgrading weapons and grinding missions to receive gear.  I played as a mage class and I would always look for the best spells and staffs in the game. I vaguely remember having this one spell that would cast meteors from my staff. After upgrading it I could morph the move into casting meteors from the sky. I loved PSU because it taught me that the magic you used would be dependent on the type of creature you were facing. Similar to Pokemon, you went farther if you used magical spells that were super effective against the enemy. PSU also gave the added element of customization for not only your character (4th floor of the mall am I right?) but also for your room. I had trophies from defeating  bosses like De-Ragan or my personal favorite the Rappy Statues (they look like chocobos lol).

PSU had it all and I loved the interaction with other players. You could present moves, dances and even phrases.  PSU was an awesome game and I was sad when the servers closed for it.

Oblivion takes the number 1 spot for me because it is the first RPG game that I really delve into.  oblivion  This game set the standard for the Elder Scrolls Game for me and I am so grateful to have discovered it. My fondest memory was being a part of the Fighter’s Guild, Mages Guild, Thieves Guild and the Dark Brotherhood at the same time. I was running all over the place with the different side missions and contracts that I was to fulfill. Each play-thorugh I would make a Khajit (cat character) and level up my stats for stealth and agility. Needless to say, I’m always a thief or assassin! !  I spent HOURS on Oblivion and I still don’t believe that I completed everything that there was to do. The replay value of this game was amazing, because you could make alternate characters give them different skills.

Those are my rankings for my top RPG Games! What did I miss? What are your favorite RPG’s? Let’s talk Video Games!

-Luna 🙂

 

Credits:

thegamerstop.com

wikipedia.com

The Psychology of Gaming

“The essence of a role-playing game is that it is a group, cooperative experience. There is no winning or losing, but rather the value is in the experience of imagining yourself as a character in whatever genre you’re involved in, whether it’s a fantasy game, the Wild West, secret agents or whatever else. You get to sort of vicariously experience those things.”
– Gary Gygax

Roleplaying in any game is a unique opportunity to escape into the lives of a constructed persona, to live lives of adventure and cunning, battle and espionage. Tabletop games especially, such as Dungeons & Dragons, provide yet another critical aspect to this vicarious living – social interaction. Whether physically surrounded by friends or strangers, or communicating by headphone over the internet, gaming allows players to create their own story instead of just reading one that is already written. The unpredictability of the campaign is what is so compelling and often addicting, since with every conversation or combat encounter, everything could completely change. When I first started gaming, as an actor I was thrilled at the opportunity to perform and take on the personas of my characters. I would often make dozens at a time, even if I would only end up playing one, just to feel the rush of creation. But the performance aspect of roleplaying turned out to be just the tip of the iceberg. By exploring the minds of the characters, I inadvertently discovered I was exploring my own mind as well.

One thing I had begun to notice over the years was that no one makes a character without reason. Something about their personality or backstory appeals to the player, and the player often injects the same traits into multiple characters – often without noticing. This develops a core pattern of the mutual psychology of gaming. Simple put, characters become reflections of the players. Most often when I’ve brought this up to players, they were completely unaware of this. Some players make the same types of characters over and over, while others are all over the map with a few unifying traits.

For example, a good friend of mine had a character whose father was addicted to painkillers and her goal was to find an “out” for him. I somewhat jokingly pointed out that all of her characters are either distanced from their parents, or helping them deal with addiction in some way. She later admitted that her real mother was currently suffering from addition and at risk of losing everything. She had never noticed the similarities in her characters until I said something.

Because characters become an extension of the player’s psyche, there are times the player can feel exposed or agitated when that extension is pointed out. Recently I played with someone who created a drunken drifter with no motivation. When I as the Narrator started asking why the character fell into drink, what he was hiding from, and what he wanted to do before becoming a drink, the female player grew rather angry and admitted that there were “personal reasons” behind the character. Soon thereafter the player quit the group.

Another player who expressed an interest in joining revealed an even darker side of human psychology. He asked if I’d allow a secretly evil character into the group, and this began a long discussion on why he felt butchering civilians and releasing plagues on innocent populations could be justified. I counter-argued, expressing my belief that because the rest of the party was good in nature they wouldn’t stand for it and would likely attack, abandon, or arrest his character. That’s when things started to get “real.” He compared the situation to real life and said, for example, “if we were best friends and I killed someone because he annoyed me, would you help me bury the body or coldly call the police despite everything we mean to each other.” This opened an entirely new can of worms. When I started discussing the fact that most humans have a moral and legal compass that would prevent them from assisting in murder, he claimed I had no concept of human psychology and promptly left. Needless to say it was a rather harrowing experience that made me realize just how deeply embedded psychology and mental relations are to the gaming experience.

Over the years I seem to have attracted players who have many deep-seeded issues that we’ve been able to address and, in some cases, heal through roleplaying. It’s a calling and responsibility I don’t take lightly. I’ve learned not to ignore players others may consider problematic. Instead I do my best to understand why players play certain characters in certain ways, good or evil. Even the lack of motivation or depth of character speaks volumes to me. In my opinion, there are no lazy gamers. Players participate in roleplaying games to portray a character and interact with in a social environment, which takes dedication and initiative. So to go through the process of finding or forming a group, getting a character created, and then keeping up with them on a weekly basis, having a background such as “his family was killed, and now he just drinks and takes up mercenary work all day” says to me that the player has issues delving into their own psyche. That’s why the character has none to probe. So, by chipping away at the lone-wolf, murder-hobo exterior of two-dimensional characters, it’s entirely possible to uncover a cavern of suppressed emotions, personal history, and family life. While I personally don’t force any player to self-analyze, nor do I recommend others press the issue, it’s worth noting that every character is in fact a manifested mask covering the face of the player. Some are comical, some serious, some valiant, some violent – but all are worth seeing with new eyes and an open heart.

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30 Day Video Game Challenge: Day 20!

Happy Tuesday Novas! I am super excited as today I have FINALLY finished the book Dark Blood that I started reading a few months ago. I wrote up a first impressions post a few months ago as well and now I can write the full book review. It should be up this week! Thank you to all of the book bloggers that have enticed me to start back reading! Also, I’m super excited that I have been writing on my story. My co-worker suggested a boo called Outlining Your Novel and it has helped tremendously with me created a generic outline that I can follow to finish my story. I’m using the brain mapping technique in which you create a chart with a central theme or plot and then you connect as many different plots, subplots, characters and incidences as you want. This allows me to have a general structure for the story but also gives me choices in which way to take things. I LOVE IT!!!! Any way on to today’s post.

Day 20 – Favorite genre.

This one is pretty easy to me. For about 8 years now I have been massively interested in the First Person Shooter genre. With the exception of the most recent COD game (Call of Duty Infinite Warfare) I have picked up each new release in the franchise at midnight on launch day. I really like a great shooter game but I am also really into sandbox, RTS and RPG games at the moment as well. For me though, shooters are still my day 1 A1 genre!

Which genre is your favorite? What are your currently working on or playing? Let’s talk video games!

-Luna 🙂

 

Credits: aminoapp.com

30 Day Challenge Gamers Edition: Day 3!

Happy Saturday Novas! I’m continuing on with the 30 day gamers challenge in which you create a blog post each day for the topic assigned. If you want to follow along, check out my first post here!

Day 3 – A game that is underrated

An underrated game is one that many people are over looking. Our friend thero159 posted their topic today in regards to a game on Steam. Click here to read their post. My pick for an underrated game would be the video game Skyforge. Skyforge was released for free on PS4 in April. My friends and I have been playing it non stop. For my response to today’s post, I want to shine some light on the video game Skyforge on PS4. I’ve been meaning to post a video game review of Skyforge for awhile now so I’d like to present a condensed version of the game now.

Skyforge is an MMORPG game that allows the player to customize their character and complete levels in order to upgrade. You start off with a choice of 1 of 3 classes and find out that you’re not like most people. You’re sort of, well you’re immortal! Now you must develop your powers and help save different worlds. You have the The Cryomancer (Damage), Paladin (Tank) and the Light Binder (Support) roles to start. There are 13 classes in total that you can unlock and you can switch between classes depending on the missions you are completing. With any MMORPG, you are also able to Here’s some game-play that I have recorded for the game. Personally, I love playing with the Cryomancer.

Currently there are about 10 different worlds in which to explore. Each world will have different levels and missions for you to journey through. After unlocking additional missions, you can start upgrading your character’s traits and strength. As you play each level, you gain followers which add to your power in the games. It’s funny, you can find followers in random corners on the levels.   This game is fantastic as there’s so much to experience. You can play different classes, play PVP, try your hand at world events and even team up for Raids. Each level will also contain at least 1 boss to fight. I say “At Least” because there may be levels where you must fight multiple bosses in order to complete the mission. If you are playing with friends, if you all die then the mission restarts.

That’s a quick over view of the Skyforge game. Look for it in your PlayStation Store! I may actually compile a full video game review for this game in the future (after I beat the main story).

Although this post is not a full review of the Skyforge game, I will still provide my top reasons to “Play” or “Skip” this game.

Play:

  • Hours upon hours of entertainment
  • Character customization, stats and abilities
  • Ease of changing and trying out new classes
  • Different game modes to choose from

Skip:

  • Grind heavy (you have to complete many missions to gain enough money to unlock different classes and costumes).
  • Can be repetitive (you will have to play the same levels in order to complete the different missions and contracts).

That’s it for today’s daily challenge post. What are some video games that you feel are underrated? Have you ever played Skyforge? Let’s talk video games!

-Luna 🙂

 

Credits: SF.MY.Com